How To Use A Speed Square

How To Use A Speed Square

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The Square That Lets You Do Many Woodworking Layout Tasks Fast

Square line, angle lines, a marking gauge, a protractor or rafter layout.

All these tasks can be performed with a speed square.

If there is one square you should own this is probably the one.

Here's a video that shows you how it's done:

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Want to find out if your square is really square?

— Click Here —

Checking Squares For Square.

 


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38 Comments

  1. Alan Webser said:

    Thanks for posting this. The only thing I have used a speed square for is 90 degree lines and guiding my circular saw. Saw this on Facebook. I need to learn how to layout raters for a shed I plan to make.

  2. Ric Boyce said:

    great tool but if you can’t use a framing square and a calculator you will never be more than a tract framer they are not very acurate

  3. Bob English said:

    you forgot to mention the diamond at three and a half inches and the marks adjacent to the quarter inch marks on the inside of the square

  4. Bob English said:

    for the past fourty years every time Ive dropped a speed square, and if you dont know it sounds like the liberty bell ringing, I’ll have some $#%&!@* say’ “hey Bob, you dropped your speed square”, no $#%&!@* dumbass

  5. Carl Shafer said:

    Dieing Breed, WHERE ARE THE HARDEST UNDER PAID CARPENTRY MEN, IS THERE ANYMEN LEFT TO DO HARD WORK @ STAY FIT DOING IT, ” J.C. ” WAS A CARPENTER BEFORE BEING NAILED TO A CROSS @ DIED FOR OUR SIN’S.

  6. Curtis Freese said:

    You can’t carry a framing square in you’re toolbags.. and if you are the cut guy on the ground cutting stringers and such then yes a framing square. I am not using a framing square to cut rafter tails

  7. Säge Späne said:

    I hate getting tangled in the fray, but…. 1) the angle of a roof is not the same as it’s slope. 2) the pitch is defined as the ratio of the rise to the span (which can also lead to confusion). 3:12 is a 3 inch rise to 12 inches of “span”, and can also be expressed as 1:4 – see what I mean? Now, a span (normally) is the distance between the outer wall extremities. But, only if your roof height is half of the span, will you then have a 12:12 (or 1:1) ratio, a 45° angle. 3) The pitch can be defined as the slope, expressed as a ratio. Just remember what you use for the span is the horizontal distance to the point of highest rise…. Now, let me get out of the weeds!

  8. Darell said:

    Nothing beats a framing square. I can do more with the framing square than anyone can do with a speed square. Check out the squangle for something really cool

  9. Timbo said:

    Much quicker way to find pitch than the plumb bob deal here- put the pivot point on the top of the truss, level it off with a torpedo lvl, and where the truss intersects the square is your pitch.

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